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Plate Tectonics


The diagram shows the supercontinent Pangaea (meaning 'all lands' in Greek). In geologic terms, a plate is a large, rigid slab of solid rock. The word tectonics comes from the Greek root 'to build.' Putting these two words together, we get the term plate tectonics, which refers to how the Earth's surface is built of plates. The theory of plate tectonics states that the Earth's outermost layer is fragmented into a dozen or more large and small plates that are moving relative to one another as they ride atop hotter, more mobile material. Before the advent of plate tectonics, however, some people already believed that the present-day continents were the fragmented pieces of preexisting larger landmasses ('supercontinents').

Plate tectonics is a relatively new scientific concept, introduced some 30 years ago, but it has revolutionized our understanding of the dynamic planet upon which we live. The theory has unified the study of the Earth by drawing together many branches of the earth sciences, from paleontology (the study of fossils) to seismology (the study of earthquakes). It has provided explanations to questions that scientists had speculated upon for centuries -- such as why earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur in very specific areas around the world, and how and why great mountain ranges like the Alps and Himalayas formed.



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Fact Credit:
USGS General
USGS Web Site

Further Reading
Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History of the Modern Theory of the Earth
by Naomi Oreskes (Editor), Homer Le Grand (Contributor)


Related Web Links
Plate Tectonics Animations
by USGS

Continental Drift and Plate Tectonics
by NASA





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