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What Is Radiofrequency Energy (Rf)?


Radiofrequency (RF) energy is another name for radio waves. It is one form of electromagnetic energy that makes up the electromagnetic spectrum. Some of the other forms of energy in the electromagnetic spectrum are gamma rays, x-rays and light. Electromagnetic energy (or electromagnetic radiation) consists of waves of electric and magnetic energy moving together (radiating) through space. The area where these waves are found is called an electromagnetic field. Radio waves are created due to the movement of electrical charges in antennas. As they are created, these waves radiate away from the antenna. All electromagnetic waves travel at the speed of light. The major differences between the different types of waves are the distances covered by one cycle of the wave and the number of waves that pass a certain point during a set time period.

The wavelength is the distance covered by one cycle of a wave. The frequency is the number of waves passing a given point in one second. For any electromagnetic wave, the wavelength multiplied by the frequency equals the speed of light. The frequency of an RF signal is usually expressed in units called hertz (Hz). One Hz equals one wave per second. One kilohertz (kHz) equals one thousand waves per second, one megahertz (MHz) equals one million waves per second, and one gigahertz (GHz) equals one billion waves per second. RF energy includes waves with frequencies ranging from about 3000 waves per second (3 kHz) to 300 billion waves per second (300 GHz). Microwaves are a subset of radio waves that have frequencies ranging from around 300 million waves per second (300 MHz) to three billion waves per second (3 GHz).

Probably the most important use of RF energy is for telecommunications. Radio and TV broadcasting, wireless phones, pagers, cordless phones, police and fire department radios, point-to-point links and satellite communications all rely on RF energy. Other uses of RF energy include microwave ovens, radar, industrial heaters and sealers, and medical treatments. RF energy, especially at microwave frequencies, can heat water. Since most food has a high water content, microwaves can cook food quickly. Radar relies on RF energy to track cars and airplanes as well as for military applications. Industrial heaters and sealers use RF energy to mold plastic materials, glue wood products, seal leather items such as shoes and pocketbooks, and process food. Medical uses of RF energy include pacemaker monitoring and programming.

Fact Credit:
U.S. FDA
U.S. FDA

Further Reading
The Invisible Future: The Seamless Integration Of Technology Into Everyday Life
by Peter J. Denning


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